Nelson Oliver |

Research Analyst


Nelson Oliver, Research Analyst

Nelson Oliver is a research analyst in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. His primary interests include urban revitalization, housing policy, and applied microeconomics.

Born in Akron, Ohio, Mr. Oliver is a graduate of Morehouse College and holds a BA in economics.

  • Fed Publications
Title Date Publication Author(s) Type

 

2014-06 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Kyle Fee; Economic Commentary
Abstract: Why has average income grown in some poor neighborhoods over the past 30 years and not in others? We explore that question and find that low-income neighborhoods that experienced large improvements in income over the past three decades tended to be located in large, densely populated metro areas that grew in income and population. Residential sorting—changes in population and demographics within neighborhoods—could help to explain this relationship.

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February, 2014 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Kyle Fee; Economic Trends
Abstract: When people compare employment conditions around the country, they usually think in terms of large regions like the Midwest and the West Coast or cities like Cleveland and Pittsburgh. But employment conditions vary widely within major metropolitan area as well. Even if a metro area experiences rising average levels of employment and income, the changes in specific neighborhoods in that metro area may be well above or below that average.

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2013-17 ; Ozgur Emre Ergungor; Economic Commentary
Abstract: One problem low-income communities may face in trying to revitalize is dealing with a high share of residents who are returning home after serving prison terms. Returning citizens often concentrate in low-income areas, and they typically lack the education and skills needed to find jobs. This Commentary reviews these and other barriers to employment, estimates the degree of unemployment, and describes some solutions emerging for this population.

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August, 2013 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Economic Trends
Abstract: In the last decade, different metropolitan areas of the United States have experienced dramatically different levels of employment growth. Stark contrasts can be seen, for example, when we compare the 50 metro areas with the highest employment growth between 2001 and 2011 to the 50 with the lowest.

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March, 2013 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Economic Trends
Abstract: It is well-known that employment outcomes such as unemployment rates and employment-to-population ratios vary markedly across demographic groups. Differences in unemployment rates are especially pronounced across age and racial groups. It is also well-known that employment outcomes depend significantly on educational attainment, and that levels of educational attainment vary across race and ethnicity. In this article, we examine these factors.

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2013-01 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Kyle Fee; Economic Commentary
Abstract: Not only has poverty recently increased in the United States, it has also become more concentrated. This Commentary documents changes in the concentration of poverty in metropolitan areas over the last decade. The analysis shows that the concentration of poverty tends to be highest in northern cities, and that wherever overall poverty or unemployment rates went up the most over the course of the decade, the concentration of poverty tended to increase there as well.

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December, 2012 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Economic Trends
Abstract: Since the 1960s, the average number of hours worked has been decreasing in the U.S. Looking at recent trends in nonsupervisory employment and average hours makes clear that the decrease is due to the growing number of people working in service-sector jobs in recent decades, combined with the fact that the average number of hours worked in that sector has been falling. One can also see that the four largest service-providing subsectors were primarily responsible for the change.

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May, 2012 ; Stephan Whitaker; Economic Trends
Abstract: Statistics on the distribution of personal income by region can be helpful context for thinking about many important questions. Can lower labor costs help the Southern states to lure corporate operations? Do the higher salaries of the Northeast and West attract Midwestern college graduates? Does everyone in the Northeast benefit from its concentrations of finance and government employment? Has immigration pulled down wages in the West?

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April, 2012 Vol. 3, No. 1 ; Daniel A Littman; Forefront
Abstract: The infrastructure of an evolving process.

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November, 2011 ; Dionissi Aliprantis; Economic Trends
Abstract: Recent data releases have focused attention on the increase in the share of individuals living in poverty since 2006. Since this increase in poverty has not only changed individuals’ economic circumstances, but also those of entire communities, researchers have been interested in understanding how those circumstances have varied across communities. One way to summarize the impact of the recent recession on communities is to examine neighborhood poverty rates.

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August, 2011 ; Ozgur Emre Ergungor; Economic Trends
Abstract: Consumption accounts for roughly 70 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). Consequently, households’ spending behavior is of utmost interest to policymakers.

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April, 2011 ; Ozgur Emre Ergungor; Economic Trends
Abstract: Consumption accounts for roughly 70 percent of gross domestic product. Consequently, households will play a substantial role in helping to sustain the recovery. Does current data suggest that a sustainable recovery may finally be here?

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