Anne O’Shaughnessy |

Project Manager


Anne O’Shaughnessy, Project Manager

Anne O’Shaughnessy is a project manager for the Community Development Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She is responsible for strategic oversight of the department’s publications, website, and social media tools. She also directs the development of marketing materials to support Community Development-sponsored events. From 2009 through 2012 she directed the planning of the Cleveland Fed’s annual Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality. Outside the Bank, she serves on the Marketing and Development Committee of Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland.
 
Ms. O’Shaughnessy joined the Cleveland Fed in 2006. Prior to that, she spent 17 years as a freelance business writer, serving corporate and small-business clients in the financial services industry.
 
Ms. O’Shaughnessy was awarded a B.A. degree in English from Northwestern University in 1984 and a Klingenstein Fellowship at Columbia University in 1987. She is working toward a Master of Arts in English at Cleveland State University.

 

  • Fed Publications
Title Date Publication Author(s) Type

 

September, 2012 Vol. 3, No. 2 ; Forefront
Abstract: Cutting-edge efforts to improve America's education system

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October, 2010 Vol. 1, No. 3 ; Forefront
Abstract: A new volume published by the Federal Reserve sheds light on the escalating problem with real-estate-owned, or REO, properties.

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June, 2010 ; Report
Abstract: Facing the Foreclosure Crisis in Greater Cleveland: What happened and How Communities Are Responding examines the foreclosure crisis as it played out in Cleveland and Cuyahoga County, and many of the local responses combating the crisis. The Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, in collaboration with Case Western Reserve University’s Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development and Cleveland State University’s Levin College of Urban Affairs, authored and produced the report.

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May, 2010 Vol. 1, No. 2 ; Forefront
Abstract: Many neighborhoods bear visible scars of the housing crisis in the form of vacant and abandoned homes. These properties attract crime, drag down the values of neighboring properties, and erode a neighborhood’s sense of community.

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